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Quotation by George Washington on Divine Providence

Topics: God

 

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Quotation by George Washington on Divine Providence.

"Providence, to whom we are infinitely more indebted than we are to our own wisdom, or our own exertions, has always displayed its power and goodness, when clouds and thick darkness seemed ready to overwhelm us. The hour is now come when we stand much in need of another manifestation of its bounty however little we deserve it."  
~ George Washington


Click here to read author biography and see other quotes by George Washington

 Photo of clouds by Rand Green.

Contextual Notes

The above quotation is taken from a letter George Washington wrote May 19, 1780. to Lund Washington, a distant cousin who managed Washington's estate and plantations at Mount Vernon during the Revolutionary War years.  It had been nearly four years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the war with England was still raging, and the situation was looking bleak. The Patriot forces had suffered a series of defeats, particularly in the South. As he had done before under similarly dire circumstances, Washington looked to God whom, in his correspondence, he frequently referred to either as Providence or the Supreme Being, convinced of the righteousness of the cause for which he fought and relying on the bounties of Heaven. He trusted in Divine Providence to sustain his troops through their darkest hours and lead them to ultimate victory, which came about 18 months later with the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

 Washington's letter to his cousin is published in The Writings of George Washington, 18:392

~ Rand Green 


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